Journal Club in Social Justice Epidemiology

The Journal Club, hosted by the Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, brings together faculty, graduate students, postdocs, and staff across UCSF to promote scholarly dialogue and collaboration. The goal is to increase understanding of issues and contexts resulting in the difference in health quality between groups and how health varies based on resource distribution. Discussions focus on the political, social, and structural factors impacting health outcome distribution.

Our aim is to provide a stimulating learning environment for both faculty and students requiring minimal preparation time. All interested are welcome – no matter their knowledge level or ability to complete the readings!

Meetings are scheduled on the second Wednesday of the month from 12 to 1 pm, with any changes noted below as needed. All meetings will be held remotely on Zoom for the foreseeable future. Upon registration you will be emailed a Zoom invitation; see below for registration links for upcoming sessions.

In the U.S., health and racism are inextricably linked. Racism and discrimination are deeply ingrained in our country’s history; rooted in the social, political, and economic systems and have continually harmed communities of color. For the 2020-2021 academic year, we will be focusing on topics related to racism, anti-Blackness, and racial discrimination.

Upcoming Sessions:

April 21, 12-1pm: Examining intersectional dimensions of identity and depression using MAIHDA

Clare R. Evans, Natasha Erickson. Intersectionality and depression in adolescence and early adulthood: A MAIHDA analysis of the national longitudinal study of adolescent to adult health, 1995–2008.
Soc Sci Med. 2019 Jan;220:1-11.

Register >>


Future meetings:

May 12: Health of incarcerated older adults

June 9: Structural racism and birth outcomes

*We appreciate suggestions for session topics and content! Including popular media articles/videos to accompany journal articles.

The club provides opportunities for faculty and PhD students to:

  • Support scholarly literacy and increase exposure to considerations of race/ethnicity in public health research
  • Introduce and discuss new theoretical or methodological approaches for health disparities research
  • Expand understanding of broader substantive and methodological implications of current research for social justice

For questions, please contact any of the organizers:

Meghan Morris, PhD, [email protected]

Chloe Eng, MSPH, [email protected]

Pamela Murnane, PhD, [email protected]